Go to ...
Ipswich24 Magazine on YouTubeRSS Feed

26/11/2020

Are you too sweet?


A team of health experts from around the world are calling on food and drink manufacturers to cut the amount of sugar in their products.

A new anti-sugar campaign is calling the sweet stuff “the new tobacco.” As a result, a U.K. based group is carrying out a new public health campaign that aims to make the public more aware of the sugar found in their food and drink, urging us to avoid products that have high amounts of “hidden” sugars. So here are some tips and information to help you cut out the sweet stuff!

donutAdded sugar is the single worst ingredient in the modern diet. It provides calories with NO added nutrients and can damage your body. Eating too much sugar has been linked to weight gain, obesity, type II diabetes, heart disease, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, tooth decay, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and more. But how much is too much? Can you eat a little bit of sugar each day without harm, or should you avoid it as much as possible?

It is very important to know the difference between added sugars and sugars that occur naturally in foods like fruits and vegetables. Naturally occurring sugars are fine; however, added sugars are a burden to our bodies. The most common added sugars are regular table sugar (sucrose) or high fructose sugar and syrups.
One of the Heart Associations recommends this is a good guide for maximum sugar consumption

• Men: 150 calories per day (37.5 grams or 9 teaspoons).
• Women: 100 calories per day (25 grams or 6 teaspoons).
To put that into perspective, one can of coke contains a 140 calories from sugar, while a regular sized snickers bar contains 120 calories!
How to Minimize Sugars in your Diet

Avoid these foods:

1. Soft & Fizzy drinks: Sugar-sweetened beverages are awful; you should avoid these like the plague.
2. Fruit juices: This may surprise you, but fruit juices actually contain the same amount of sugar as soft drinks!
3. Sweets & Chocolate: You should drastically limit your consumption of sweets, or avoid totally.
4. Baked goods: Biscuits, cakes, etc. These tend to be very high in sugar and refined carbohydrates.
5. Fruits canned in syrup: Choose fresh fruits instead.
6. Low-Fat or Diet Foods: Foods that have had the fat removed from them are often very high in sugar.
7. Dried fruits: Dried fruits in moderation but avoid dried fruit covered in syrup or extra sugar.

Try to drink water instead of fizzy drink or juices and don’t add sugar to your coffee or tea. Instead of sugar in recipes, you can try things like cinnamon, nutmeg, almond extract, vanilla, ginger or lemon. Just be creative and use Google to find recipes. Beware of sugar replacements like aspartame this is an alleged carcinogen causing even more problems within the body. A natural, zero-calorie alternative to sugar is Stevia.

The best way to cut back on sugar is to simply avoid processed foods and satisfy your sweet tooth with fruits instead. However, if you’re simply unable to avoid unprocessed foods, then here are some tips on how to make the right choices:

• There are many different names for sugar: Sugar, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in, dehydrated cane juice, fructose, glucose, dextrose, syrup, cane sugar, raw sugar, corn syrup and more.
• If a packaged food contains sugar in the first 3 ingredients, avoid it.
• If a packaged food contains more than one type of sugar, avoid it.
Some people can handle a little bit of sugar in their diet, while for others it causes cravings, binge eating, rapid weight gain and disease. We’re all unique and you need to figure out what works for you. Just keep in mind that when it comes to a harmful substance like added sugar…
The less, the better so start being less Sweet!

Health & Peace to you all – Jules

For more information about this article, Naturopathic advice or Allergy Testing contact Jules Button (BSc) Email: jules@rainbowapothecary.co.uk or call 01394 386777 or pop into Rainbow Apothecary 6E Church Street Woodbridge IP12 1DH

www.rainbowapothecary.co.uk

More Stories From Jules Button Column

About