Go to ...
Ipswich24 Magazine on YouTubeRSS Feed

02/12/2020

Bard Subject of New Play


Suffolk based playwright, Suzanne Hawkes, premiers a new play this summer based on the trials and tribulations of a travelling player, Shakespeare.
It’s 1596 and Shakespeare’s Company, The Chamberlains Men, are on Tour. For Will its been a rough year – evicted from their theatre in London his actors are squabbling, his wife’s on his case, his son is ill, and plague threatens all their livelihoods – added to which they are suspected of harbouring Spies – or Catholics – or worst of all – Playwrights! Suffolk beckons – a place for new material, new beginnings – and settling old scores.
With Music, Song, Revels and Morris Dancing this play is part of the RSC Open Stages Project celebrating the 450th Anniversary of the Bard, The New Wolsey Open Season and The Ip Art Festival and is sponsored by Stan Gaskin Ltd and supported by Grants for The Arts
Shakespeare In Suffolk will be performed at The Orwell Hotel in Felixstowe Monday 8th and Tuesday 9th June. Tickets are available from Abbeygate Lighting or by calling 01394 279613.
The play will then journey to Ipswich where you can see it at St Peters on The Waterfront, from Wednesday 10th until Friday 12th June and at Christchurch Mansion on Sunday 14th, Saturday 20th and Sunday 21st June. Tickets are available from the New Wolsey Box Office by calling 01473 295900
Black&White Productions are a Suffolk based community theatre company who aim to entertain and educate with plays rooted in local events and characters. Previous productions include – Thomas Wolsey – The Rise and Fall, Giles!, Becoming Orwell, In Heath and in Sickness – The Story of The Bartlet and Mr Dickens.
Comments from the first week’s run: “Brilliant” “An absolute delight” and “Suzanne Hawkes has such an obvious joy of language, seamlessly interweaving Shakespeare’s works and words with artistic licence, whilst informing the play with sound research.  The simple cast of a travelling band of players much as one imagines they would have been.”

More Stories From Theatre

About